And God sang

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By Dave Henning / September 12, 2014

“It’s not about what you do.  It’s about why you do what you do.  Ultimately, it’s about who you do it for.”- Mark Batterson

“Man’s chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy Him forever.”- Westminster Shorter Catechism

Mark Batterson introduces Chapter 12 (“SDG- Soli Deo Gloria”) of All In with the observation that listening to the music of Johann Sebastian Bach is a rapturous experience, but not just because of the melodies and harmonies.  The motivation behind Bach’s music is the key.  Before Bach began scoring a sheet of music, he would scrawl J. J.- Jesu juva at the top.  It was a simple prayer: Jesus, help me.

Similarly, Pastor Batterson encourages, each of our lives is an original score.  He adds:  “No one can glorify God like you or for you.”  For Bach there was no distinction between sacred and secular.  Everything was created by God and for God.  For example, Arnold Summerfield, a German physicist and pianist, observed that a single hydrogen atom emits one hundred frequencies.  It’s more musical than a grand piano, which emits eighty-eight. In other words, every atom is a unique expression of worship.

Interestingly, noted composer Leonard Bernstein believed the best translation of “and God said” (from Genesis 1) is “and God sang.”  In that sense, creation is like a symphony orchestra.

Today’s question: Have you heard God singing during your desert, transformational journey?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “Whatever!”

About the author

    Dave Henning


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