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The gift of weakness – His strength is enough

By Dave Henning / January 9, 2018

“The gift of weakness is that it leads us to the only strong one.  And his strength is enough.  Enough for this day.  Enough for this life.  More than enough, actually.  It is all that we need.”- Ann Swindell

“But he said to me, ‘My strength is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.’  Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ’s power may rest upon me. . . .  For when I am weak, then I am strong.”- 2 Corinthians 12:9-10 (NIV)

Ann Swindell concludes Chapter 2 of Still Waiting as she discusses 2 Corinthians 12:9-10.   Ann states the Greek word for weakness in this passage = astheneia.  That Greek word refers to a weakness of the body or of the soul.  However, both meanings connect to a lack of strength.  Precisely, the definition of astheneia refers to “want of strength.”

As Ms. Swindell notes, body weakness results from physical illness, or frailty.  But weakness of the soul consists of the inability to:

  • understand something
  • restrain oneself from doing something wrong
  • carry burdens and trials
  • do anything glorious or great

Furthermore, the author observes, God isn’t deaf or ignoring you.  He hears every single one of your prayers.  The question: Do you have ears to hear what Jesus wants to say to you?  Therefore, Ann asks, what if Jesus:

  1. told you that your weakness doesn’t discuss or repel him in the same way that weakness disgusts you?
  2. asked you to enter into your weakness rather than run away from it?
  3. told you His strength is greater than any strength you can access in yourself?
  4. informs you that He’s not only the bridge but the other side itself?

In conclusion, Ms. Swindell states, God uses our weaknesses to lead us into a place of waiting where we’re solely dependent on Him.

Today’s question: How has the gift of weakness show you that God’s strength is enough?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “We spend ourselves on what we value the most”

About the author

Dave Henning


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