• Home  / 
  • Blog
  •  /  The joy of Jesus remains -experience a deep truth

The joy of Jesus remains -experience a deep truth

Avatar
By Dave Henning / May 12, 2018

“The joy of Jesus remains in your life and your joy becomes full when you are serving others.  This isn’t just a nice idea; it’s a deep truth you can experience.”- Banning Liebscher

“These things I have spoken to you, that My joy may remain in you, and that your joy may be full.”- John 15:11 (NKJV)

As Banning Liebscher continues Chapter 10 of Rooted, he asserts that to mature as believers reflecting the Father’s heart, we must allow God to teach us in “It’s not about me” situations. And while humbling experiences tend to be less than joyful, they serve to remind us true joy comes through serving others.  In addition, humbling experiences provide opportunities to gain more of the Father’s heart.

Next, Pastor Liebscher discusses the second reward of serving, the joy of Jesus that remains.  That joy stands in stark contrast to the prevailing cultural lie that joy’s found in self-fulfillment.  However, as Banning astutely observes:

” . . . a mindset defined by selfishness and the fear of lack cannot lead to joy or happiness; it only leads to more restlessness and dissatisfaction. . . .  The most joyful people I know are also the greatest servants I know.”

Furthermore, the author explains, serving also functions as a place of safety,  That’s because whenever we align ourselves with Jesus, we avoid stepping into spiritual danger zones.  Also, safety – the third reward of serving – offers protection as it positions us for God to add increased blessing, responsibility, and influence.  Therefore, this increase won’t crush us.  Yet, Pastor Liebscher believes, many people fail to walk in all God has for them.  If God released it to them, they’d be hurt.  Thus, it’s essential to position our lives alongside Jesus, who came to serve, not to be served.

Today’s question: How does the joy of Jesus manifest itself in your life?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “Exalting ourselves – the destructive effect”

About the author

    Dave Henning


    >