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Wrestle with the Truth or wallow in turmoil

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By Dave Henning / March 30, 2019

“We don’t even like to touch dust, especially if it’s made up of the shattered pieces of our own hearts.  Thankfully, we don[t have to.  We can hand it over to God — the one who forms our dust into something we want but never could have made for ourselves. . . .  it’s better to wrestle with Truth than wallow in turmoil.”- Lysa TerKeurst

“Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance.  Let perseverance finish it’s work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything.”- James 1:2-4

In Chapter 11 (“Upside Down”), the concluding chapter of It’s Not Supposed to Be This Way, Lysa TerKeurst asserts that it’s easy to consider it pure joy when the drive-through coffee joint messes up your order.  As Ms. TerKeurst quips, just put a little Jesus on it and you’ll feel quite mature.

However, it’s much more difficult when it comes to those things that hurt too long or disappoint too deeply.  It’s almost, Lysa observes, like a bad joke about something excruciatingly painful.  That’s why, the author adds, she’s glad that the verses from James don’t say to feel the joy.  Rather, consider where some glimpses of joy might be, even in the midst of all the hurt.

Because sometimes you find it hard to locate your footing with your own faith.  At those times, you need to stand on someone else’s faith for a while.  And when you do, you’re able to consider the presence of joy in the midst of unimaginable disappointment.  Spilling tears of joy.  Lysa adds:

“Tears are the truest connection we have with others, and trust is the truest connection we have with God. . . .  Trust.  Trading our will for ‘Thy will,’ because we know He will.”

Today’s question: Would you rather wrestle with the Truth or wallow in turmoil?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “Quick to judge the reliability of God”

About the author

    Dave Henning


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