Done With That: Escaping the Struggle . . .

Done With That (David C. Cook, 2019)

Done With That: Escaping the Struggle of Your Old Life, is the third book written by Bob Merritt, senior pastor of Eagle Brook Church in the Twin Cities area.  Above all, Pastor Merritt believes there’s power in saying I’m done with that!  And saying that really involves the ability to say no.  But, for every wise no, a better yes exists.  Futhermore, God gives grace, forgiveness, and second changes to those who present themselves as humble, teachable, and willing.  Also, growing, learning, and dealing with your weaknesses continues throughout life.  Yet, the challenge of living the Christian life consists of more than the cost of discipleship.  To see the whole truth,one must clearly emphasize the cost of non-discipleship.

In addition, the more you develop an awareness of your sin, the closer you draw to God and His truth.  Hence, you realize just how far from God you’ve been in the first place and how sinful you remain.  Plus, the right stimulus can trigger your sin nature and overwhelm your resistance or good judgment.  And, as long as you blame someone else for your situation, you’ll fail to get better.  Instead, you remain stuck and helpless.  However, Pastor Merritt exhorts, it’s possible to overcome whatever challenge or defeat you face – choose to live a better life.  Ignoring the pain, in contrast, prevents you from living the new life God wants you to live.  Therefore, acknowledge the pain and resolve to do something about it.

Living the new life, then requires three steps: humility, honesty, and hard work.  Consequently, knowledge alone is never enough.  Rather, getting healthy involves work.  While far too many people know better, though, they express no interest in doing better.  To change you must own your own life.  For lasting change transforms from the inside out – with a focus on a real relationship with Christ.  However, we must transform our minds before we transform our lives.  As a result, the author counsels, cultivate discerning minds to bring everything into alignment with Christ.  The Lord faithfully realigns our thoughts to be more in sync with His as we delight in Him.  Thus, to achieve peace with God and with ourselves, we must abandon the middle.

Finally, Pastor Merritt cautions, the middle represents the worst place to be.  Often we find the middle filled with moral and relational land mines.  The worst thing about that middle position, however?  Our relationship with God wanes.  So, we’re either slaves to sin and death, or slaves to obedience and life.  Certainly, the author notes, we rarely view sacrifice as fun or entertaining.  In contrast, sacrifice is fulfilling and purposeful.  A healthy soul permeates our entire being.  We find God and restore our souls in the stillness as we’re done with that.  Pastor Merritt encourages:

“God is constantly looking for you, calling your name, and hoping you’ll hear His voice and let Him lead you back to a life of safety, bounty, and love.  Will you let Him?”

About the author

    Dave Henning


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