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Random activity – or persistent movement?

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By Dave Henning / November 20, 2019

“The question is not about random activity but persistent movement.  Our impact and influence are largely the result of our habits.  It’s not what we do one day; it’s what we choose to do on repeat from one day to the next.”- Jeff Manion

On Day 4, Week 1 of Dream Big, Think Small Jeff Manion asserts that chronic inconsistency provides the signature characteristic of mediocrity.  Therefore, Pastor Manion deems dreaming big worthless unless it’s accompanied by a faithful, daily grind.  As a result, if you desire to build a life that impacts others, you must exhibit faithfulness over time.

Next, moving on to Day 5, the author relates the account of the 1911 race to the South Pole between Robert Scott (Great Britain) and Roald Amundsen (Norway).  Robert Scott chose to hammer out the maximum amount of miles each day – but only under favorable conditions.  However, Roald Amundsen set a goal of trudging no more than twenty miles a day, regardless of weather conditions.

Not surprisingly, Amundsen reached the South Pole first.  Above all, he returned to base camp with his entire team on the exact day he predicted.  Unfortunately, Scott and his exhausted team perished on their return trip.  In fact, they died just eleven miles short of a supply depot.

In conclusion, Pastor Manion explains, benefits accrue when you develop a pattern, or disciplined routine with your activities.  The author writes:

“What legacy will you build one day at a time as you embark upon your own twenty-mile march?  What seems too big for you to tackle all at once?  Legacies aren’t built in a day.  They grow over time, step by step, mile by mile, and day by day.  Dream big, think small.  Success in the large things requires dependable commitment in the small things.”

Today’s question: Do you find yourself engaged in random activity or persistent movement?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “Gauging our spiritual and emotional resources”

About the author

    Dave Henning


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