Prisoner of perspective, or prisoner of hope?

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By Dave Henning / January 4, 2020

“If you let your circumstances define the way you see God, you are a prisoner of perspective.  Or worse, a prisoner of your past mistakes.  But if you let God define the way you see your circumstances, you are a prisoner of hope.”- Mark Batterson

“Return to your stronghold, O prisoners of hope; today I declare that i will restore to you double.”- Zechariah 9:12 (ESV)

Mark Batterson concludes Chapter 1 of Double Blessing as he proclaims this essential core belief: God honors bold prayers because bold prayers honor God.  As a result, Pastor Batterson reflects on what he considers the most unique binary blessing in the Bible.  Zechariah declared this promise to the Israelites after their bitter defeat at the hand of the Babylonians.

However, even thought Zechariah proclaimed God’s promise to Jewish refugees living in the fifth-century BC, Pastor Batterson asserts that this promise also belongs to us.  Because, as Hebrews 13:8 tells us, Jesus Christ’s the same yesterday, today, and forever.  In addition, Mark explains how to position ourselves to receive God’s blessings:

“Every blessing in the Bible is part and parcel of our spiritual birthright by virtue of what Christ accomplished on the cross.  Positioning ourselves for those blessings begins by kneeling at the foot of the cross and ends with us casting our crowns before the throne of God.  In between, we flip every blessing.

Finally, after experiencing wrenching loss, it take time to get on your feet and adapt to the new normal.  Therefore, Mark counsels, when you try to shortcut sorrow, it short-circuits the soul.  Above all, God’s peace helps you manage the pain.  And, God’s promises help you overcome it.

No game is won or lost at halftime.  Since, Mark believes, the blessings of God overtake obedience, you can rally and come back.

Today’s question: Do you feel more like a prisoner of perspective or a prisoner of hope?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “Umbrella of blessing = an extra measure of grace”

About the author

    Dave Henning


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