Strugglers – admonish them with truth

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By Dave Henning / March 14, 2020

“Strugglers don’t need our opinions.  They don’t need our philosophies on suffering.  They don’t need someone to distract them with idle conversation . . . They need someone to admonish them with truth.”- Max Lucado

“His powerful Word is as sharp as a surgeon’s scalpel, cutting through everything, whether doubt or defense, laying us open to listen and obey.  Nothing and no one is impervious to God’s Word.  We can’t get away from it, no matter what.”- Hebrews 4:12-13 (THE MESSAGE)

Max Lucado concludes Chapter 9 of How Happiness Happens as he exhorts us not to sit idly by while Satan spreads his lies.  Because the struggler needs someone to unsheathe God’s sword – the Word of God.  Furthermore, we need to brandish that sword’s glimmering blade in the face of evil.  Part of the whole armor of God.

Consequently, Pastor Lucado underscores, you activate a weapon of the Spirit when you quote or read Scripture in the face of pain or doubt.  And as the blade of God’s sword slashes against the rope of the Devil, that releases his prisoners.  Therefore, Max states, think of Scripture-based admonishment as anti-bacterial cream.  Even though we may not know how that cream heals, we simply know that it does.  Thus, Max counsels, “apply it and see what happens.”

Above all, Pastor Lucado urges, spread words of hope as well as pray prayers of faith.  For, the author notes, faith-filled prayer:

  • is a prayer of admonishment
  • invites God to be God, to reign sovereign over a tumultuous time

Finally, Max encourages:

“You can do this.  Do not shrink back.  After all, you are an ambassador for Christ.  Can an ambassador stay silent?  You are a child of God.  Would a child not speak up for his father?  You are a coheir with Christ.  Can the heir remain silent while the blessings are available?”

Today’s question: When God brings strugglers into your life, how do you admonish them with truth?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “Buster – we all have one, or two or ten”

About the author

    Dave Henning


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