A more integrated and peaceful internal life

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By Dave Henning / September 7, 2018

“When your protectors become prayerful and your exiles find strength, your internal life will become more integrated and peaceful.  You’ll enjoy more compassion for others and an ever-deepening intimacy with God.”-Alison Cook and Kimberly Miller

“Jesus said to him, ‘Go; your son will live.’  The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him and went on his way.  As he was going down, his servants met him and told him his son was recovering.”- John 4:50-51 (ESV)

As Alison Cook and Kimberly Miller continue Chapter 6 of Boundaries for Your Soul, they discuss the soul’s suffering parts.

3.  The Suffering.  As the authors note, Jesus didn’t blame nor marginalize the suffering.  Instead, He encouraged, helped, and treated them with respect.  Whether it concerned a man unable to walk (Mark 12:2) or a young boy on his deathbed (John4:50), Jesus asked the suffering person to do something before his/her healing.  And, Alison and Kim underscore, Jesus wants to empower the suffering parts of you.

In addition, the authors observe, the suffering characters we encounter in the Gospels sound like our exiles.  Consider three common beliefs of the suffering soul:

  • Insecurity: I’m not as important as other people.  Why would God bother with me?
  • Doubt: Does God really care?  Why would He let me suffer so much?
  • Bitterness: I’m angry at God because of what He has let happen to me and to those I love.

In conclusion, Alison and Kim exhort you to invite Jesus to draw near:

“Invite Jesus to draw near, and you might notice his invitation for them to take leaps of faith that seemed impossible before.  In his presence, these suffering parts of you find comfort and healing.  With healthy boundaries, exiles can transform into beautiful aspects of your humanity- channels of empathy and grace.”

Today’s question: What Bible verses sustain a more integrated and peaceful internal life?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “Leave your unwanted thoughts and feelings at the door?

About the author

    Dave Henning


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