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How we walk with the broken

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By Dave Henning / April 15, 2017

“How we walk with the broken speaks louder than how we sit with the great.”- Pastor Bill Bennot

Esther Fleece concludes Chapter 10 of No More Faking Fine as she stresses the need for empathy and presence when someone experiences hard times.  In the depths of pain, Ms. Fleece adds, none of us need correction to our theology.  Specifically, others need to give us credit for hanging in there during tough times.  Furthermore, we need comfort more than criticism.

Lament occurs in the context of honesty.  Esther explains:

“We don’t have to always make everything sound so nice and pretty and ‘Christian’ when it’s not.  Things are not always okay.  God never silences a lament in Scripture, so why would we think  we can?  God doesn’t always rush to answer our laments, but He never minimizes our pain or tells us to ‘just get over it already.’  God does not ignore the cries of His people and He never, ever abandons us. . . . Instead of silencing those who are hurting, let’s start training our ears to hear the night cries.”

Therefore, laments help us roll out of our uncomfortable emotions and rise up from hopelessness.  Also, we’re privileged to love each other as well as listen without offering solutions as we join in lament.

In conclusion, Esther state that rushing the process of healing cheapens it.  Times of suffering potentially birth deep treasures.  In the midst of struggle, the healing process develops resilience and character.  On the other hand, offering trite formulas and pious platitudes characterizes conditional love.  Ms. Fleece notes:

” . . . lamenting is actually a testimony of God’s great love for us.  It demonstrates that we have a God who listens to us, a God who hears us, and a God who concerns Himself with every area of our lives, both great and small.”

Today’s question: How has your vocation loss helped you walk with the broken?  Please share.

Tomorrow’s blog: “The other side of lament”

About the author

    Dave Henning


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